Friday Night Done Right

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Summer weather has taken over the high desert as the sweltering days give way to cool evenings that make for the best conditions for a night of cold beer, hot food and good music. Johnny Fingers, off of 7th avenue and Lorene drive, was this exact place to be on June 23rd, where the Twenty Dollar Prophets and company took over the bar for a night of rock, hip-hop and reggae. Featuring some of the best performing artist floating around the high desert scene (all of whom were present at Oddfest earlier this month, check out the article here), the show made for a smooth and pleasant evening of great live music. Unfortunately, it didn’t start out that way.

The original lineup of bands was set to feature Twenty Dollar Prophets, Odd Bridges, Mirk Beniah and Swift Sonorous,  The Muppet Hunters and The Rezinators, but unfortunately The Rezinators and Muppet Hunters were unable to make it (special shout-out to them anyways). In their place, Rain Brings Weather swung in at the last minute to serve as our evening’s opening band. Dewey and crew delivered a powerful set of alternative rock filled with emotion, which is the driving element of Rain Brings Weather’s sound. “I don’t even worry about the sound or what genre our songs are, I want the fucking emotion. I want the passion. I want to express what I have to say,” said Dewey B. Weather.

“And that’s a common ground in all of us, you know,” guitarist Bigs added, “If we weren’t great musicians, at least we put our heart into it.

“For sure, I’m probably the worst guitar player at most of the shows we play, you know what I mean.”

“And I’m the second worst.”

Following Rain Brings Weather was Odd Bridges, another band whose genre is difficult to define for similar reasons. Mike Eberhardt took some time to explain his process when it comes to writing music, “I don’t try to write songs. I’ll just sit down and I’ll just start strumming, I’ll get a chord pattern and we just kind of make up these songs on the fly… … I don’t try to say ‘I’m gonna make a song that sounds like Elton John’ or ‘a song that sounds like Prince’ or whatever, it just comes out like that.”

Listening to Odd Bridges, you can hear the roots of other bands and nuance that I’ve seen in other artist, but it’s hard to exactly say, ‘Odd Bridges sounds like ___’. This sentiment is shared by Mike, who is confused by some of the comparison’s he’s gotten, “A lot of people, like years ago, used to say my stuff sounded like Tom Petty. I never got that… … How can people say we sound like The Melvins or Mudvayne or whatever when I don’t hear any of that.”

Tom Petty and the Melvins is certainly an odd combination, but it’s the right kind of unusual that I would devour. Regardless of how you want to define them, Odd Bridges is an alt-rock delight. Following them was Mirk Beniah with Swift Sonorous. The two of them teamed up to bring fiery hot energy to Johnny Fingers. In my interview with Mirk, I found out that he has been active since 2009, but took a break for a little while. He is now back at it and ready to prove he is not going anywhere, “U.G.A. (UnderGround Anthems) is still here, we’re just revamping things. We got the Royal Dynasty, Sorry Not Sorry, Swift Sonorous, Royalhighnessz, Chris Effects, Malibu Sprinkles. Shout out to Karen Denise and Swift and The old dynasty, you know, much love.”

Mirk was one of two artists I was not able to get a one on one interview with at Oddfest, so when I asked about his feelings about the festival and the state of music in the high desert, he had nothing but positive things to say, “I’m loving the energy, man, you know what I mean. Michael, from Odd Bridges, you know, he was the one that made it possible, bringing me out… …It was a beautiful thing, man, being able to rock out there. We jammed out real good. It was dope.”

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When I asked what the future had in store for him, all he had to say was “Big things. We got big things going all the time, so any time we’re in the building, there’s gonna be something big. As you see, we brought out Malibu Sprinkles, we opening up for the Twenty Dollar Prophets; they’re the most popular band out here in the desert. Shout out to Rain Brings Weather, Odd Bridges, all the bands, man. Muppet Hunters, the Rezinators, and U.G.A!”

As for me, I had the host of the evening, the Twenty Dollar Prophets, to look forward to for my immediate future. The group, locally located right here in Victorville, is making big waves in the scene with their mix of hard rock and reggae. The group wanted to give a shout-out to their sponsors Vape Out and Irie Roots Extract, the latter of which had a free wax sample for me (which in no way affects the personal bias of this article or viewpoint of this blog).

That being said, Twenty Dollar Prophets was amazing. The best band in my life.

REMEMBER KIDS, JUST SAY ‘NO’ TO BIASED JOURNALISM

I spoke with front man Chris immediately after the set and got his feelings of his performance, “I feel love and energy from the crowd and I could never replace the feeling of entertaining people for as long as we did without them getting bored.”

Twenty Dollar Prophets has been active for two years and the guys have kept themselves busy in that time, “in that [two years] we’ve produced five music videos, two albums, and played hundreds, I’d say probably close to two hundred shows already. You know what I mean, because that’s all we do, every weekend. This weekend, for instance, we have three shows and next weekend, we have one show and the weekend after we have two shows.”

With another album and video on the way, Twenty Dollar Prophets don’t look to be slowing down anytime soon. All the bands and artist share that same kind of passion and devotion for performing and making music, which is why these kinds of shows are popping up more and more. When two of the opening bands pulled out at the last minute, Chris and crew held the event together and still managed to pull off a successful evening by in part because of friendship these bands share. The growth of this musically community over the last two years in the high desert is a result of these musicians coming together and building camaraderie among one another.

-b.d. ponce

Book a show or grab a brew @ Johnny Fingers Bar and Grill

The Muppet Hunters’ Facebook

The Rezinators’ Facebook

Rain Brings Weather’s Facebook

Odd Bridges’ Facebook

Mirk Beniah’s Facebook

Swift Sonorous’ Facebook

Twenty Dollar Prophets’ Facebook

Something Odd In Those Hills: ODDFEST 2017

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June 14th, 2017
by Brian Donald Ponce

 

Oddfest 2017 hit the stages of the Hilltop Tavern and Inn Saturday, June 10th for its second annual music festival promoting and celebrating the best music the High Desert can offer. Put on my Michael Eberhardt with the rest of the guys at Odd Bridges, the festival featured nineteen bands and artist from genres ranging from punk, alternative, hard rock, reggae and hip-hop. It was an eclectic representation of the state of music in the High Desert, which is far cry from the state of the scene five years ago, where the closure of several established venues and the failure of others cast a shadow over the talent in this region. Oddfest 2017 is a strong indication that those days are behind us.

The line-up of bands featured Manifest Illusion, At Your Six, Anti-Socialite, Hoodlife Hippiez, Mondo Silicone, Delta Shade, Rain Brings Weather, Odd Bridges, Twenty Dollar Prophets and Mirk Beniah on the main stage with Atomik:Kangaroo, Just SayN, The Modern Three, ZODRHI (or Zombie Dress Hipsters), The Companies, Jade, The Lillies, Dead Rekoning and Kryptic Moons on the second stage. We had a good blend of seasoned veterans like The Lillies, Rain Brings Weather and The Companies joined by rising acts like Anti-Socialize and Mondo Silicone, the latter of whom celebrated the one year anniversary of their first show at the Oddfest 2016.

Like last year, Oddfest was held at the Hilltop Tavern and Inn, which offered a good selection of beer and a stunning view of the High Desert. Unlike last year, this year’s Oddfest came with a $12 cover charge that included two free drinks. The only downside was that you had to get both drinks at the same time, which may not seem like much of a problem for most people. However, when you’re trying to conduct interviews while double fisting a couple of beers, it can be somewhat cumbersome (I persevered nonetheless).

 

The day started off well with bands like Atomik:Kangaroo, Manifest Illusion, Just SayN, The Modern Three, Anti-Socialite and At Your Six bringing their own brand of punk and alternative to the Hilltop. Every band brought their “A” game, but allowed themselves to be relaxed in a friendly environment of local musicians and music lovers. “We’re gonna mess up a little bit, but its okay,” said Kylie Sloncik of The Modern Three.

Jorge Arias of Just SayN appreciated the geniality of the crowd. “We like how open people are to our music. They’re not like, ‘naw, I’m not into that’,” said Arias. Arias and the rest of Just SayN stuck around for the rest of the day to show support for the rest of the bands, as did many other groups. This is just a small example of the level of camaraderie this community of musicians shares for one another. It may not be unique, but it is significant.

As the day progressed, bands like Hoodlife Hippiez and Mondo Silicone tore up main stage while The Companies and ZODRHI got people dancing over on the second stage. The Companies, who are based outside the High Desert in the greater Inland Empire, commented on the growth of the scene. “Years ago, I came here looking for some punk bands to join, but there were pretty much only metal bands for a while,” said Dustin Strandvery of the Companies. When I asked Hoodlife Hippiez the same question, the general consensus among its members was that it was “Awesome” with one of the group’s three front-men, RSIN, adding “it’s all for the music. We love it.”

Early in this decade, we saw the closure of venues such as the Karma and Angel’s Roadhouse 2, as well as the briefly lived Victorville Events Center. It seemed like stages for bands to play on were disappearing left and right, leaving some bands to move out of the high desert, dissolve or make their own stage. That last option is exactly what Mike Eberhardt has been doing for the past two years with his group, Odd Bridges. It started in 2015 with the first Cold Turkey Fest at Gators in Apple Valley and since then, Eberhardt has put on four festivals featuring local talent.

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Photo by Paul McDonald

Odd Bridges, as well as the entire festival, is credited by Eberhardt’s band mates Jason Trevino and Brandon Jones as being his brainchild. “I put a lot of credit to Mike for helping revive the scene,” said Brandon Jones of Odd Bridges, “He lugged the gear in, played the shows and lugged it out. He was making the calls, making the contacts and when they couldn’t pull through, he did it himself.”

That certainly was the case for most of the day as I was only able to get five minutes with Eberhardt while he and the guys from Rain Brings Weather worked tirelessly on helpings bands set up and break down. Tyler Skelton of At Your Six mentioned the rigidness of the schedule, “Our set was a little rushed, but we were happy with what we played.”

Things certainly did run smoothly as bands got ample time to show off what’s going on in their side of the desert. Jade, Delta Shade and The Lillies kept the energy rolling into the night. Marty Calderon of Jade, another group that has been floating around the scene for the last five years, just said, “We just need to keep pushing [the music scene].” I approached Matthew Humphrey of the Lillies with the same question. “Man, why do you keep asking me questions? Just leave me alone,” said Humphrey

“Yeah, man. You’re the enemy,” added his band mate, Robert Pereda.

“Don’t take whatever we say out of context.”

“Yeah… …fuck… …Matthew Humphrey… …worst… …guitarist ever…”

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Photo by Paul A. McDonald

Dewey B. Weather of Rain Brings Weather commented further on the dissolution of the scene after the closure of so many venues. “I remember it, it was really discouraging. Now, we got promoters coming up from San Diego because they see potential, and we’re just a bunch of deserts rats killing it.” Dewey had been there since 9 o’clock in the morning, working hard along with Eberhardt keeping the festival running smoothly. The two of them finally got a break to perform with their bands, Rain Brings Weather and Odd Bridges, later in the night.

From there, Dead Rekoning and Kryptic Moons closed out the second stage while Twenty Dollar Prophets and Mirk Beniah mellowed out the night after a day of music, tacos and booze. Otis “Mutherfuckin” Jones of Twenty Dollar Prophets was there for most of the day and spoke highly of the event. “Every band did a great job. Each band out did that last band. Everyone from the sound guys, the organizers, even the bartenders did a great job.”

Oddfest 2017 was blast from start to finish. When I asked Mike what his plans were for the next festival, he just said, “Eventually, we want to get headliners. I think, for every year, we want to make it bigger.” Mike wants to thank his band mates, Dewey B. Weather, Art Guerra, Brandon Burgess, and Spot Fillmore for their hard work, Shaun from Erupt Designs for making their flyers, Hilltop Tavern and Inn for letting them play, and to all the bands for coming out and having a good time.

– b.d. ponce

All pictures used were provided by Paul McDonald and Paul A. McDonald of Just SayN and Shaun Michael of Erupt Design.

Atomik:Kangaroo’s Facebook

Manifest Illusion’s Facebook

Just SayN’s Facebook

At Your Six’s Facebook

The Modern Three’s Facebook

Anti-Socialite’s Facebook

Hoodlife Hippiez Facebook

ZODRHI’s Facebook

Mondo Silicone’s Facebook

The Companies’ Facebook

Delta Shade’s Facebook

Jade’s Facebook

Rain Brings Weather’s Facebook

The Lillies’ Facebook

Odd Bridges’ Facebook

Dead Rekoning’s Facebook

Twenty Dollar Prophets’ Facebook

Kryptic Moons’ Facebook

Mirk Beniah’s Facebook

Erupt Design’s Facebook

Hilltop Tavern and Inn’s Facebook

Twenty $ Dollar Prophets new music video “Shadows”

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On March 25th 2017, SoCal Urban Reggae band Twenty $ Dollar Prophets hosted an event at Gators in Apple Valley to announced the release of their new music video “Shadows.”

It was a packed venue with Epic! Radio in the house to MC the event. Supporting bands who performed were Dubious Distinction, The Lillies, Muppet Hunters, Dubsiders and The Rezinators. The sounds were a good mixture of Reggae, rock and rap. Patrons danced, mingled and chilled as they sipped their drinks while one of high desert’s favorite bartenders, Skylar, served up the drinks. It was a puff of a good time.

Here’s a video clip from that night:

The “Shadows” music video is a contrast between night and day.  The daytime and exterior of a building appears to representing a current, brighter situation, while the dark interior of the building along with the haunting characters appear to represent a haunting past of one that is lurking in the “Shadows.”

Watch the video below and let us know your thoughts!

Like the Twenty $ Dollar Profits Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/TwentyDollarProphets

And keep updated on what’s happening at Gators Apple Valley at https://www.facebook.com/gators.applevalley

Check out Epic! Radio http://epicradio2.wixsite.com/epic-radio

 

-Mo